• Study delivers protein across blood-brain barrier to degrade Alzheimer's plaques
    Biologists substantially degraded Alzheimer’s plaques in mice brains and human brain tissue by sending a fused protein across the blood-brain barrier. Their technique not only offers a potential strategy for treating the debilitating neurological disease, but also other diseases that affect the brain and eyes.
  • Human stem cells predict efficacy of Alzheimer drugs
    Why do certain Alzheimer medications work in animal models but not in clinical trials in humans? A research team has been able to show that results of established test methods with animal models and cell lines used up until now can hardly be translated to the processes in the human brain. Drug testing should therefore be conducted with human nerve cells, conclude the scientists.
  • Scientists accelerate aging in stem cells to study age-related diseases like Parkinson's
    A study has revealed a new method for converting induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into nerve cells that recapitulate features associated with aging as well as Parkinson’s disease. The simple approach, which involves exposing iPSC-derived cells to a protein associated with premature aging called progerin, could enable scientists to use stem cells to model a range of late-onset disorders, opening new avenues for preventing and treating these devastating diseases.